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president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad on the budget side, as i said. includin
, this is "democracy now!" >> in egypt, the united states followed standard operating procedure. standard procedure when one of your favorite dictators gets into trouble. first, the support him as long as possible. but if it becomes really impossible, say the army turns against him, then you send him out to pasture and get the intellectual quest to issue declarations about your love of democracy, then try to restore the bill system as much as possible. >> "who owns the world?" with the presidential election less than two away, we turn to a major new address by noam chomsky on pressing topics not addressed in the president to campaign -- climate change, latin america's break with the united states, the arab spring, and the danger nuclear-weapons already pose in the middle east. >> israel refuses to allow inspections at all, refuses to join the non-proliferation treaty, has hundreds of nuclear weapons, advanced delivery system, and a long record of violence and repression. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are
are a big country. what will other countries take away from the united states at this summit? >> most of the countries here outperform us, which is -- >> switches? >> it is the student performance. these countries outperform us. they do not measure against a narrow range of outcomes. so, i think it is interesting for the world to see that the united states is finally participating in this and that we care. because our reputation worldwide is that we are the most creative country on earth. everyone comes here to learn about what we are creating. then they take it back and they do what they will. so, i think the other countries have really appreciated that the united states is now at the table with them. i think when we listen to the various ways these countries are achieving the success they are achieving, we cannot continue -- we cannot continue to follow the policies in education because they're 100 degrees off from what successful countries are doing. >> what would be the number one priority? >> number one priority for me would be to stop setting up all of our systems so that they a
. >> they're two of the most well-recognized journalists in the united states. pioneers and advocates. for more than two decades maria and george have informed million of hispanics through the popular evening newscast. their brand of journalism is characterized not only by subjective and perspectives, but also by a high degree of social advocacy. in the last three decades both have covered a wide range of news and have witnessed history in the making. >> mexico, oh, yes. >> from presidential elections around the world to the most destructive natural disasters. maria has interviewed dictators, revolutionaries, world leaders, heads of state in latin america, and in the united states. she was among the first female journalists to report from the war torn streets of baghdad. george has covered five wars and right after the terrorists attack on september 11th he drove all the way from miami to new york to report on the tragedy firsthand. once he even asked for a vacation to cover the war in afghanistan. an assignment that at the time the network deemed too dangerous. he's had very public e
who has a remarkable story about death in iraq and reunion in the united states. >> the i interviewed a guy in the peace, a psychiatrist who used the term moral injury and he said a lot of soldiers and marines stuff from moral injury, which he described as sort of it happens when you get an order, you do something that you believe at the time was absolutely correct and the only thing you could do, and it turns out to have been, to have terrible consequences. that is basically what happened here. >> rose: american foreign policy and a dexter filkins story. when we come back. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. additional funding provided by these funders. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with the 2012 election last night, president obama and mitt romney balanced it out in the third and final debate. at lynn university in boca raton florida, the suggest was foreign policy but discussion often veered toward domestic concerns as well, the two men addressed a range o
in pakistan, 75% of the pakistani to identify the united states now as their enemy, not as their supporter or their allies. in many ways, we are seeing a very ill-conceived, irresponsible, and immoral or policy come back to haunt us where the united states foreign policies have been based, unfortunate, on brute military force and wars for oil. under my administration, we will have a foreign policy based on international law and human rights and the use of diplomacy. instead of fighting wars for oil, we will be leading, as america, a leading the fight to put an end to climate change. in afghanistan and iraq, we have spent about $5 trillion. we have seen thousands and thousands of american lives lost, hundreds of thousands of civilian lives lost, about $1 trillion a year being spent on a massive, bloated military, industrial security budget. instead, we need to cut the military budget, right sizes year 2000 levels, and build a true secured here at home, bringing our war dollars home. >> rocky anderson from the justice the party, yet two minutes. >> the question was whether the killings of th
in the united states, christians love jesus but so do buddhists and jews and hindus and people without any religion whatsoever. >> the jesus image is multiadaptble because we are a 3489 religious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put jesus on the national agenda andn people of all different religions and without anyt all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began your book with? >> well, presumably it's no because he didn't have anything else to do, i mean, he was a pretty busy guy in the white house but he ordered a couple books from england, a couple bibles and he sat there in the white house and he cut and pasted and took out the miracles and took out the resurrection. he believed jesus was a good guy, he believed he was one of the most important philosophers ever but he didn't like christianity and he was able to separate out christianity from jesus, say no to christianity and say yes to yeast. >> ho
is strengthening as it approaches the east coast of the united states. these are live pictures from maryland as the national hurricane center warned of a life-threatening storm surges and hurricane winds. a magazine editors charged with breach of privacy in greece. and election results in the ukraine suggest they might not have an overall majority. welcome to bbc world news. china appears for a change of leadership. how will it affect ordinary people? we will hear from villagers living in the shadows of the great wall. and there's a new environment. the east coast of the united states is waking up to what could soon be a super storm. 140 kilometers per hour winds battering large areas as the hurricane grows in strength. sandy is expected to bring with it a life-threatening storm surge. these are live pictures from new york. the city waking up in darkness at the moment. in maryland, residents are bracing for the category one hurricane. this is live from maryland. 50 million people are affected on the east coast. schools and transport has been closed down. mandatory evacuation of hundreds of t
for president of the united states. >> today in a "democracy now!" special, we look at the life and legacy of senator george mcgovern, best known for running against president richard nixon and an anti-4 platform. >> as one whose heart has eight for the past 10 years of the agony of vietnam, i will hold the senseless bombing on and our role day. >> as a family spokesperson confirms senator mcgovern is in hospice care, unresponsive and there in the end of his life, we will play extended excerpts of the documentary "one bright shining moment: the forgotten summer of george mcgovern." it traces his historic campaigne presidency. >> that is the highlight of my life, i guess, winning the democratic nomination of the oldest political party in american history. i remember excited faces, people laughing and talking, some weeping. there was a lot of emotion and passion in that campaign. and i will take those memories with me the rest of my life. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we're on the road in sacramento,
. >> rose: how much of that is borne by the united states, both in terms of budget and in terms of resources? >> a lot, of course. the united states is the biggest ally accounting for around 80% of the overall defense expenditure in our alliance. so it really is a huge contribution. but politically i think it's of jut most importance also for a superpower like the united states to have allies in europe, like-minded democracies. i find it of utmost importance that democracies in europe and north america stand together shoulder to shoulder to defend our common values. >> rose: when you talk about missile defense, against missiles coming from where? >> well, actually, our missile defense system is not directed against any specific country but it aims at protecting our populations against missile threats from wherever. >> rose: incoming missiles from wherever they come from? >> exactly. and we know that more than 30 countries around the world have missile technologies rohr aspiring to get missle technologies, some of them with a range to hit population centers in europe. so we want to protect ou
, whether it is efforts in the united states or efforts anywhere on any continent. certainly, i think what is happening in parts of south asia is deeply, deeply troubling. we saw last week in pakistan what happened when a 14-year-old girl was singled out on a bus and shot for standing up for girls' education. i know that she is now in the u.k. receiving the care that she needs to regain her health and go back to hurt important work. certainly, it is critical that those of us who believe only when we live in a world where every person can participate to their full potential is the world we want to see. >> you have definitely found your voice, and you have said that you want to have a public life. is that taking office? >> i don't know. to take office, how have to be elected in the united states. before my mom's campaign in 2008, i would have said no, not as a result of any long, deliberate, thoughtful process, but because of being asked questions for as long as i can remember. >> has america lost a dynasty? >> i don't know about that. i feel a strong call for public service. that is why i a
it in the united states. i keep ps of economic data about to, -- a key piece of economic data about to come out. >> gdp and payrolls. the figure of gdp, probably a continuing growth, around 1.8%. important to understand that these figures are annualize, so it shows what the growth would be over the whole year if growth continued at the rate it does during this quarter. it is expected to be about 1.8%. it is coming from good figures in retail and housing spending -- on houses. there is a bit of a bounce in the housing market. whether it can be maintained is a very different question. what people are thinking is that growth has gone up a little bit, but it is not going to go up much further. the chief economist at schroders -- is what he said about it. >> the areas of strength in the gdp report, probably in the consumer and housing side, areas close to the electorate. although the headline is not very good, the details might be a little bit better from a political perspective. >> what people are expecting next year, probably growth of about 2.2%, 2.3%. >> not bad for europe's point of view. [laug
, promtorys, inlets, deserts, features. take the united states. why did the 13 colonies develop as they do? one of the reasons was it was jam packed with natural well-protected harbors in the northeast. and the tempered zone of what is now the united states, it was last resource-rich part of the temperate zone that was settled by europeans at the time of the enlightenment and it had more miles of inland waterways than the rest of the world combined. so that enabled the development of american nationhood. these facts are so obvious that they get overlooked in the current debate. >> rose: i want to take different countries and look at it to understand your thesis, both in terms of their history and future and elements of their geography that make them who they are take china today. >> okay. all right. take china. china has two big geographical issues. on the one hand, china is big, it's vast. because it's stretching out in terms of the its corporate enterprises, its demography into the russian far east where there's always this timber, diamonds and gold that the chinese want. a hundred milli
of tension between the prime minister of israel and the president of the united states. but all of that is entirely obama's fault. anything that's wrong with the u.s./israel relationship is obama's fault. the fact that the prime minister of israel has continued with a settlement policy which is extremely controversial in israel somehow comes no where into the equation. so we're supposed to believe on the one hand that america's supposed to lead the arab world from the front with one hand while adopting a policy toward israel that is more pro-israeli than anything any government in washington has articulated for a long time. how the two of them will go together i don't know. and for good measure, though-- and i think this is praiseworthy-- governor romney has called for a palestinian state and a two-state solution, something on other occasions he's been less than supportive of. so it's kind of a mishmash for me. that's how i see it. >> rose: a couple things. one, on syria, he seems to want to support the rebels with arms, at least. that's different. >> yeah. and here i think -- i
for president of the united states -- will effectively shut down while folks are voting and a week before: open nationally. it is a remarkable turn of events, and i do not think anyone knows what the outcome will be. tavis: i am a sports guy, so in any particular game, if there is something that causes a stoppage in the play, some rained out games, it always depends whether they were making a comeback. it does have an impact if they have to stop for the weather. might this be the situation politically, that one side will be harmed if they have this stoppage? >> i think that is the best comparison. in football or baseball you want to keep doing the same thing, and the analogy for politics, you do not want anything to interrupt that. i am trying to get beyond campaign status. 9-11 was early, but there were a couple that were at fault. 9-11 with the races at a standstill. i am not comparing the tragedy of 9-11 with the impending smith storm -- with the impending storm, but it will certainly carry on tomorrow. we are talking about three days or four days, not just before the election, but while bot
majority -- >> let me ask you what percentage of the hispanic community in the united states does not speak english. how big a barrier is language as you mentioned? >> that's pretty high. >> i think for the youth they speak english it's really interesting because they're the ones translating for their parents. in terms that you have a lot of those that come from latin america, when you look at the politics of latin america they equate politicians to corruption, it is what they do. the idea of having to deal with politics coming tolt united states not necessarily that's like for second nature. they would prefer to not have to go along, work with -- go to school, do what they have to do. they're such a voice and part of our united states that we need them to get more involved in that. >> i think that -- does it make sense for candidates to be fighting so hard, clearly -- >> i'm saying if only ten out of 24 million latinos go to the polls. >> as hard as they fight for young people to go to the polls, i know that as democrats we're counting on high turn out among latinos, among african american
in the united states. the nation magazine has released what is said to be one of the few known audio recordings of new york city police questioning of young men of color and to the department's controversial stop and frisk program. the audio was recorded last june by a harlem teenager who says he was stopped frequently by police. on the recording, police officers can be heard telling the teenager he looks suspicious because he had his put up and was looking back at them. they also threatened him with physical violence and used rationalized language, calling him a mutt. >> do you want to go to jail? >> for what? >> shut your mouth. >> what am i getting arrested for? >> for being a mutt. >> [indiscernible] the surgeon is holding me like this insane, "i am going to break your arm -- and saying, "i'm going to break your arm and punch you in the face." >> new york city police, by their own account, and conduct more than 1800 stop and frisks every day. more than 20% of them are reportedly with force. people of color are disproportionately targeted. those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy
11 attacks khalid sheikh mohammed told a courtroom on@nesday the united states has killed more people in the name of national security than he is accused of killing on 9/11. he drat addressed the court during a hearing at of his troffer coordinated attacks. speaking through a translator, khalid sheikh mohammed said that while about 3000 people were killed on 9/11, the u.n. is states has killed thousands or even millions. he said -- a u.s. drone attack on a farmhouse in southern yemen has nine people suspected -- has california -- killed nine people suspected of the militants. residents said they found remains of nine bodies, including a senior al qaeda militant. authorities have arrested a 21- year-old bangladeshi man they say was attempting to blow up new york's federal reserve building with fake explosives provided as part of an elaborate sting operation. officials say quazi mohammad nafis believed he was remotely detonating a 1000-pound bomb. on wednesday, new york police commissioner raymond kelly said nafis had come to the united states to commit some sort of jihadi. >> this indi
that we are very close to the united states which is clearly an advantage, but also we are investing a lot of infrastructure and in a very important thing, charlie, which is human capital. we have built in this six years 140 new universities from greenfields, public and free tuition universities. and we add there are like 113,000 new engineers graduating every year in mexico so today there are more engineers every year than in germany or u.k. or canada or brazil. and with that, a lot of companies, american and global companies are realizing that mexico is very, very competitive in manufacturing, for instance. even vis-a-vis china. >> rose: ed thing we read about are two big issues, one is narco terrorism. what is it going to take to win that battle? the second is immigration. >> well first a lot of courage, because otherwise it is impossible to deal with that. and you need to have the principals that no one nation could prosper without rule of law. because that is exactly our main focus, in the sense that we are not prosecuting drugs by drugs themselves. we are looking for rule of law in m
of the united states. and of western capitalism. it's very, very threatening. and i think that that's why you've had the billionaire class. you know, the minute barack obama -- i would actually say rather gently suggested that the millionaires and the billionaires should pay a little bit more, you had immediate cries of class warfare from the plutocrats, and very emotional. you know, there was an activist investor who sent an e-mail to his friends, the subject line is, battered wives. and in the e-mail, he compares himself and his fellow multimillionaires to battered wives who are being beaten by the president. he actually uses those words. >> and i thought it was really interesting, in your book, how you pointed out that bill clinton himself responded to obama's criticism by saying, you know, i would have done it a little bit differently. i think, you know, you can't attack these people for their success. and i think that's very relevant, because if you go back in time it wasn't always this way, but i think the shift really began with clinton and the new democrats. i think after, you know, w
persons that come into the united states, take good paying jobs from students that have just graduated like jeremy. we need to preserve jobs in america for american citizens first and none of the other presidential candidates are addressing this issue. it is not politically correct, but it is one thing we could do right away that jobs in america for american citizens first. i would also end obamacare, which is a real restraint on job creation among small businesses. they are fearful of the fines, the taxes, and also the regulations that are going to be imposed on them under this. we can have more jobs and small businesses if obamacare is eliminated. i also favor more energy growth in all areas in this country. drilling for oil, drilling for natural gas from utilizing coal. i like alternatives, too, but we need to be energy independent, for is more energy in this country. it is helped russia and canada with thousands of jobs in those nations. these are the things we can do so that the jeremys will have jobs when they graduate. >> rocky anderson, the justice party. >> it was amazing to m
in london, lawyers are challenging the extradition to the united states on health grounds. it is being seen as a last ditch attempt to avoid being sent to the u.s., where he faces accusations of kidnapping. the bbc for the spares -- for affairs correspondent is that the high court for us. we seem to have had quite a few less the thames, as we keep calling them. what is the basis of this latest appeal? >> it is on health grounds. a couple of weeks ago the european human rights court had their final say. that four other serious terrorism suspects could be sent to the u.s. to face trial. certainly, a british government officials thought there would be no reasonable grounds to act. the last reasonable grounds that they have are his health. they want this stop so that they can have a stand on, they say that his health is rapidly deteriorated in and has been since 2004. they say that the mri scan it may establish that he is not fit to stand trial in a prosecution. if that were the case, it would be oppressive to extradite him to the united states. it is a very strange argument, but if you cast yo
the islands. chinese officials have criticized japan and the united states for planning a joint exercise next month on an uninhabited island nearby. personnel will try to recapture the remote island from enemy forces. >>> japanese officials are looking for support from britain. the prime minister told his british counterpart william hague that the senkaku islands are an inherent part of japanese territory. >> translator: the two countries agreed that the issue should be tackled peacefully in accordance with international law. >> gemba said the japanese government will deal with the matter calmly and take into account peace and stability in east asia. >>> another japanese institution is feeling the backlash from the dispute between japan and china. the chinese director of a movie in this year's tokyo international film festival has decided to withdraw his entry from the competition. the news agency says the film director is pulling his movie from the festival. he's an associate professor at the beijing film academy. his film depicts a woman struggling with her family's expectations during the
on foreign policy and the united states' role in the world. the two men running for president of the united states sat down across the table. they took turns criticizing each other. barack obama and mitt romney met in boca raton, florida, two weeks before americans go to the polls. they exchanged differing views about the u.s. foreign policy. >> we ended the war in iraq, refocused our attention on those who actually killed us on 9/11. and as a consequence, al qaeda's core leadership has been decimated. in addition, we're now able to transition out of afghanistan in a responsible way, making sure that afghans take responsibility for their own security. >> what's been happening over the last couple of years is as we've watched this tumult in the middle east, rising tide of chaos occur, you see al qaeda, rushing in, you see other jihadist groups rushing in. they're throughout many nations in the middle east. they argued over policy in libya, syria and iran and romney criticized obama's foreign policy as a failure and said the u.s. should take a leading roll. a cnn poll taken after the debate,
, president kennedy pledged the united states would not invade cuba and would withdraw its medium-range nuclear missiles from turkey. it appeared the moment of danger had passed. but new documents shortly to be published from the archives of christoph's deputy during the crisis tell a different story. this woman describes the contents. >> what these declassified documents show is the cuban missile crisis it entered a new stage of crisis. we know now the soviet union delivered not only strategic missiles to cuba, medium-range missiles to cuba, but also over 100 tactical nuclear weapons. and these weapons were not covered by the agreements between kennedy and khrushchev. >> the agreement between washington and moscow came after the most critical day of the crisis, known as black saturday. >> black saturday, october 27, was the peak of the crisis. both kennedy and khrushchev felled the situation -- felt the situation was slipping out of control and they had to do something to end the crisis. one that -- one u2 was shot down. in the caribbean, the u.s. was trying to bring out soviet s
. for example in the united states, the message is -- be careful not to go over the fiscal cliff, or to hit the debt ceiling. because that would be detrimental to economy and confidence. >> we are seeing relatively strong growth in emerging markets. how susceptible would you say are they to the global downturn? >> well they are. if something were to happen in the united states or a fair escalation of the crisis in the area no one is immune. this is why a key policy message from our report is that -- this country's, must keep their guard up. and then, preserve -- the -- policies, that they have in case they have to use the it later on. >> okay. heard from imf chief this week. she says more needs to be done with regards to greece. how much progress has been made in terms of them implementing reforms. can they implement need read forms before october 1th leaders' summit as some are demanding. >> i don't think there is a fixed deadline. our people are in athens. discussing with the greek authorities. we are making progress. on the different, use. we are diskucussdiscussing. fiscal policy. struc
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 158 (some duplicates have been removed)